Monthly Archives: February 2012

The Meaning Of Different Color Roses

People order millions of roses every year for special occasions and holidays, such as for weddings or Valentine’s Day. The two traditional colors for these two events is white and red. But what about the other shades of roses? What is the meaning of different color roses and how can you use them to express yourself?

Roses come in many varieties of color but the main ones are yellow, Orange/Peach, Lavender/Purple, Pink, Red and White.
RosesYellow Roses – The sun has always been a symbol of warmth and life giving power. And yellow roses are no different. We give yellow roses to those people we wish to share our joy, delight or happiness with. Yellow roses are a sign of true friendship, of “Congratulations” or “Welcome Back”.

Orange (Peach) Roses – Orange has long been a color of vibrant energy. A gift of orange roses means passion, desire or a personal fascination or longing. Peach roses with their more muted colors are a sign of sincerity, gratitude or sympathy.

Lavender (Purple) Roses – The lavender rose symbolizes love at first sight. They are a sign of enchantment and mean, “I adore you”. Purple roses are also symbols of instant enchantment but also of elegance and grandeur. Is also a modern sign of alternative relationships.

Pink Roses – Grace, gentility and refinement are the meaning of pink roses. This rose is gentle emotions, sweet and innocent thoughts. Pink roses are often given as gift of admiration or simple joy and happiness.

Red Roses – This color rose has long been the ancient symbol of love and beauty. The lover’s rose, red roses means steadfast and enduring love. Red is also the symbol of great courage and respect. Its simplest meaning is, “I love you”.

White Roses – White is an ancient symbol of purity and innocence in the West. As such white roses are often part of bridal bouquets as a sign of honor, loyalty and for new beginnings. White roses are also a sign of respect or remembrance.

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Details About The Beautiful Tulip

Tulips are spring-blooming perennials that grow from bulbs. Depending on the species, tulip plants can grow as short as 4 inches (10 cm) or as high as 28 inches (71 cm). The tulip’s large flowers usually bloom on scapes or subscapose stems that lack bracts. Most tulips produce only one flower per stem, but a few species bear multiple flowers on their scapes (e.g. Tulipa turkestanica). The showy, generally cup- or star-shaped tulip flower has three petals and three sepals, which are often termed tepals because they are nearly identical. These six tepals are often marked near the bases with darker colorings. Tulip flowers come in a wide variety of colors, except pure blue (several tulips with “blue” in the name have a faint violet hue).
Tulip
The flowers have six distinct, basifixed stamens with filaments shorter than the tepals. Each stigma of the flower has three distinct lobes, and the ovaries are superior, with three chambers.The tulip’s fruit is a capsule with a leathery covering and an ellipsoid to subglobose shape.Each capsule contains numerous flat, disc-shaped seeds in two rows per chamber.These light to dark brown seeds have very thin seed coats and endosperm that does not normally fill the entire seed.

Tulip stems have few leaves, with larger species tending to have multiple leaves. Plants typically have 2 to 6 leaves, with some species having up to 12. The tulip’s leaf is strap-shaped, with a waxy coating, and leaves are alternately arranged on the stem. These fleshy blades are often bluish green in color.

Tulips are indigenous to mountainous areas with temperate climates and need a period of cool dormancy, known as vernalization. They thrive in climates with long, cool springs and dry summers. Although perennials, tulip bulbs are often imported to warm-winter areas of the world from cold-winter areas, and are planted in the fall to be treated as annuals.

Tulip bulbs are typically planted around late summer and fall, in well-drained soils, normally from 4 inches (10 cm) to 8 inches (20 cm) deep, depending on the type planted. In parts of the world that do not have long cool springs and dry summers, the bulbs are often planted up to 12 inches (30 cm) deep. This provides some insulation from the heat of summer, and tends to encourage the plants to regenerate one large, floriferous bulb each year, instead of many smaller, non-blooming ones. This can extend the life of a tulip plant in warmer-winter areas by a few years, but it does not stave off degradation in bulb size and the eventual death of the plant due to the lack of  vernalization.